Explore Careers – Occupation: Biologists and Related Scientists

    

Explore Careers –

Occupation:

Biologists and Related Scientists                   

link: http://www.workingincanada.gc.ca/LMI_report_bynoc.do?&noc=2121&reportOption=outlook                           

Location:

All regions across Canada

Limited : LimitedFair : FairGood : Good

          

Community/Area

Employment Potentials and Trends

Alberta

N/A

Athabasca–Grande Prairie–Peace River Region

N/A

Banff–Jasper–Rocky Mountain House Region

Good – Employment prospects are good for biologists, ecologists and environmental scientists in this region. The area contains two large National Parks and ecologically sensitive areas that are intensively studied and monitored by biologists. Most biologists in the region work for government, private environmental consulting firms, or non-profit conservation groups. Biologists can find job listings and professional contacts at the Alberta Society of Professional Biologist (ASPB). (Release date:  2012-10-04)

Calgary Region

N/A

Camrose–Drumheller Region

N/A

Edmonton Region

Fair – Currently the chances of qualified Biologists and Related Scientists finding employment are considered to be fair in the local area. While there is moderate growth in areas related to biotechnology, these are very specialized jobs and in many cases require doctoral level education. For those with an undergraduate degree only, opportunities may be limited. (Release date:  2011-06-06)

Lethbridge–Medicine Hat Region

Limited – Compared to other occupations, this is a relatively small occupational group in the local area with few and infrequent job opportunities. (Release date:  2009-12-08)

Red Deer Region

Fair – Currently the chances of qualified Biologists and Related Scientists finding employment are considered to be fair in the local area. While there is moderate growth in areas related to biotechnology, these are very specialized jobs and in many cases require doctoral level education. For those with an undergraduate degree only, opportunities may be LIMITED. (Release date:  2011-02-15)

Wood Buffalo–Cold Lake Region

N/A

British Columbia

N/A

Cariboo Region

N/A

Kootenay Region

Good – The number of work opportunities for biologists is relatively small in the Kootenays; however, qualified and experienced biologists should have little difficulty securing employment. Although the Kootenay region employs less than four percent of BC’s estimated 3,500 biologists and related scientists, unemployment is historically very low for this occupation in the Kootenays. Most Kootenay biologists work in conservation biology, with specializations in forestry and wetlands habitat, and fish and wildlife management. About half of all Kootenays biologists work in environmental consulting firms and a third work in government. Qualified biologists interested in working in the Kootenays can find job listings and professional contacts at the Association of Professional Biology. (Release date:  2012-03-28)

Lower Mainland – Southwest Region

N/A

Nechako Region

N/A

North Coast Region

N/A

Northeast Region

N/A

Thompson–Okanagan Region

N/A

Vancouver Island and Coast Region

N/A

Manitoba

N/A

Interlake Region

N/A

North Central Region

Limited – Compared to other occupations, this is a relatively small occupational group in the local area with few and infrequent job opportunities. (Release date:  2011-12-19)

North Region

Limited – There are very few biologists employed in Northern Manitoba; employment opportunities are unlikely. Some biologists who are based elsewhere may travel to Northern Manitoba for work on specific projects. (Release date:  2012-03-29)

Parklands Region

Limited – Compared to other occupations, this is a relatively small occupational group in the local area with few and infrequent job opportunities. (Release date:  2011-12-19)

South Central Region

Limited – Compared to other occupations, this is a relatively small occupational group in the local area with few and infrequent job opportunities. (Release date:  2011-12-19)

Southeast Region

Limited – Compared to other occupations, this is a relatively small occupational group in the local area with few and infrequent job opportunities. (Release date:  2011-12-19)

Southwest Region

Limited – Compared to other occupations, this is a relatively small occupational group in the local area with few and infrequent job opportunities. (Release date:  2011-12-19)

Winnipeg Region

Good – Job opportunities for biologists in Winnipeg are good. Winnipeg has a strong and growing life sciences sector centred on biopharmaceuticals, agriculture, and biomedicine which drives demand for biologists. Biologists tend to have very low unemployment in Winnipeg. Lay-offs at a major biotechnology firm may temporarily increase competition for employment opportunities, but do not seem to reflect an underlying weakness in demand for biologists in the labour market. (Release date:  2012-03-29)

New Brunswick

N/A

Campbellton–Miramichi Region

Limited – Currently the chances of qualified Biologists and Related Scientists finding employment are considered to be limited in the local area. Employment opportunities for Biologists and Related Scientists may vary in different communities across the province. You may want to check for specific opportunities in your community. Also, people who are able to work elsewhere may want to research the opportunities for this occupation in other areas of NB or in other provinces across the country. According to the most recent (2006) Census, this is a small occupational group with a labour force of 50. According to the most recent Canadian Occupational Projections System (COPS) Forecast, the average annual employment growth rate for this occupation is above the average for all occupations in New Brunswick. in the northeast there is little turnover among those employed by government departments involved in natural resources and environmental regulation. Opportunities may exist in the expanding aquaculture sector. Many of the jobs in this occupation can be found in these main industries: public administration as well as health care and social assistance For more information on Biologists and Related Scientists (opportunities in other areas, training, who hires, current job openings and additional statistics), please click on one of the links below or select another option from the left sidebar. (Release date:  2012-06-04)

Edmundston–Woodstock Region

N/A

Fredericton–Oromocto

Fair – Currently the chances of qualified Biologists and Related Scientists finding employment are considered to be fair in the local area. Employment opportunities for Biologists and Related Scientists may vary in different communities across the province. You may want to check for specific opportunities in your community. Also, people who are able to work elsewhere may want to research the opportunities for this occupation in other areas of New Brunswick or in other provinces across the country. According to the most recent (2006) Census, this is a small occupational group with a labour force of 95, and an unemployment rate (0%) that is below the average (8%) for all occupations in the area. Also, the average age of biologists and related scientists is 42, which is above the average age (40) of all occupations. According to the most recent Canadian Occupational Projections System (COPS) Forecast, the average annual employment growth rate for this occupation is above the average for all occupations in New Brunswick. Many of the jobs in this occupation can be found in these main industries: 1) Public Administration and 2) Health Care and Social Assistance industries. This occupation is classified as “significant” because there is a large percentage of Biologists and Related Scientists working within the area and/or it is a strategically important occupation to the local labour market. This sector is in decent shape after getting knocked about a bit during the recession. Biology has changed immensely in the past 15 years, so retirement is not very common. Most new biologists are what referred to as molecular biologists. The employment outlook is expected to be fair. For now, a lot of the demand for these occupations is institutional. However, in terms of long-term planning, we will start seeing hiring taking place in companies that are diversifying their natural resources base (crop production and processing, forestry, etc.) into new bio-products. Employers don’t have too much problem finding someone with their needed skill sets. A more challenging hunt is for people with both science and management training. If someone met the qualifications, they would have average opportunity of finding a job in this occupation in this area. There are experienced or trained people for this occupation that are unemployed in the area as UNB and Université de Moncton graduate more people than can be absorbed in New Brunswick. For more information on Biologists and Related Scientists (opportunities in other areas, training, who hires, current job openings and additional statistics), please click on one of the links below or select another option from the left sidebar. Date Published: 2011-09-02 (Release date:  2011-09-02)

Moncton–Richibucto Region

Limited – Currently the chances of qualified Biologists and Related Scientists finding employment are considered to be limited in the local area. Job opportunities in this occupation can be found in these industries: public administration, health care and social assistance, and professional business services. There are few employment opportunities for biologists. This is an occupation with more specialized skills, and potential employers and job seekers sometimes manage to connect before a vacant position is advertised. Some employers require workers in this occupation to have a Ph.D., while others consider a Master’s degree to be sufficient. Individuals with only a Bachelor’s degree are likely to have considerable difficulty getting a job in this field. The Atlantic Cancer Research Institute is a major player in cancer research and has its headquarters in Moncton. The Department of Fisheries and Oceans also employs a large number of biologists. Government provides some funding to the biotechnology sector, but it is difficult to tie this in with direct employment. The environment, water, and air and soil quality have been trendy issues of late. There may also be job opportunities for biologists in the agricultural, forest and marine industries. The provincial government is focusing some of its economic development efforts on the development of eco-tourism and the use of biotechnology in the agricultural industry. Despite the trends and emphasis on the environment, this still appears to be an occupation with limited activity and limited employment potential in the province. Employment opportunities for Biologists and Related Scientists may vary in different communities across the province. You may want to check for specific opportunities in your community. Also, people who are able to work elsewhere may want to research the opportunities for this occupation in other areas of NB or in other provinces across the country. (Release date:  2012-05-10)

Saint John–St. Stephen Region

Limited – Currently the chances of qualified Biologists and Related Scientists finding employment are considered to be limited in the local area. Employment opportunities for Biologists and Related Scientists may vary in different communities across the province. You may want to check for specific opportunities in your community. Also, people who are able to work elsewhere may want to research the opportunities for this occupation in other areas of NB or in other provinces across the country. According to the most recent (2006) Census, this is a small occupational group with a labour force of 90. According to the most recent Canadian Occupational Projections System (COPS) Forecast, the average annual employment growth rate for this occupation is above the average for all occupations in New Brunswick. Many of the jobs in this occupation can be found in the Public Administration, Health Care and Social Assistance and Professional Business Services industries. The aquaculture industry in the local area has some employment opportunities for marine biologists. The St-Andrews Biological Station (Fisheries and Oceans Canada), the Huntsman Marine Science Centre in St. Andrews and the Grand Manan Whale & Seabird Research Station are potential employers for workers in this occupation. Another area for biologist in the local area is in the forestry industry. J.D. Irving Limited operates a tree nursery in Juniper and a tree improvement facility in Sussex. Biologists and related scientists work in collaboration with universities, government and not for profit agencies. The recruitment process for employers is not always done in traditional ways. In some areas, working relationships are established during research projects when the person is attending university. Job openings in public administration are advertised on websites at: http://jobs-emplois.gc.ca for federal government jobs and http://www.gnb.ca (under employment) for provincial government jobs. Budget restriction is a factor that influences employment for workers in public administration and for workers in government funded agencies. The number of opportunities for graduates at the bachelor level is limited for biologists. As a result, many graduates continue their studies at the masters or doctoral level. At the national level, a shortage of biologists with a PhD exists for research, thus people in this occupation may have to be mobile to find work. There is a shift in biotechnology towards interdisciplinary programs combining systems engineering with microbiology and other scientific specialties. Graduates with multi disciplinary backgrounds may be more attractive to employers. For more information on Biologists and Related Scientists (opportunities in other areas, training, who hires, current job openings and additional statistics), please click on one of the links below or select another option from the left sidebar. (Release date:  2011-07-06)

Newfoundland and Labrador

<Not assigned>

Avalon Peninsula Region

Limited – Employment prospects for Biologists and Related Scientists are expected to be limited in 2011- 2012 Biologists and Related Scientists make up a small occupational group in the Avalon Peninsula region. Workers in this occupation are employed mostly in Public Administration. Budget constraints within federal and provincial governments may limit new employment opportunities over the forecast period. However, those with post-graduate degrees relevant to local research projects have a greater chance of finding employment. Employment opportunities in this occupation are considered to be below average or relatively weak in the local area. However, a limited outlook should not prevent anyone from pursuing a specific career in which they are interested. (Release date:  2012-02-21)

Notre Dame-Central-Bonavista Bay Region

Limited – EMPLOYMENT POTENTIAL According to the 2006 Census, only a small number of people are employed in this occupation in the Notre Dame – Central – Bonavista Bay region. Therefore, it is likely that the chances of finding employment in this occupation are LIMITED. This means that there are relatively weak employment opportunities for skilled workers in this occupation. Although employment opportunities are limited in the Notre Dame – Central – Bonavista Bay region, opportunities may exist in other regions of the province. People who are interested in work elsewhere should research the opportunities for this occupation in other labour markets across the province. (Release date:  2011-11-07)

South Coast–Burin Peninsula Region

Limited – EMPLOYMENT POTENTIAL According to the 2006 Census, only a small number of people are employed in this occupation in the South Coast-Burin region. Therefore, it is likely that the chances of finding employment in this occupation are LIMITED. This means that there are relatively weak employment opportunities for skilled workers in this occupation. Although employment opportunities are limited in the South Coast-Burin region, opportunities may exist in other regions of the province. People who are interested in work elsewhere should research the opportunities for this occupation in other labour markets across the province. (Release date:  2011-11-07)

West Coast–Northern Peninsula–Labrador Region

Fair – EMPLOYMENT POTENTIAL Employment prospects for Biologists are expected to be FAIR in 2011-2012. Some employment opportunities are expected to come from the creation of new positions and the need to replace workers as a result of normal staff turnover. This is a small occupation in the region so only a few openings are expected to result from people leaving this occupation. Individuals employed in this occupation are older than the average worker in the local labour market. Although those employed in this occupation are older than the average in the local labour market, only a limited number of job openings are expected to result from retirements. Employment opportunities may vary depending on the specific location chosen within the region. Individuals are encouraged to discuss employment opportunities with employers in the geographical area in which they are interested. Employment opportunities for this occupation may not be as readily available as those which have a GOOD outlook. However, a FAIR outlook should not prevent anyone from pursuing a specific career in which they are interested. In addition to employment opportunities locally, opportunities may exist in other areas of the province, the country and outside the country. People who are able to work elsewhere may want to research opportunities for this occupation in other labour markets within Newfoundland and Labrador, across the country and in other parts of the world. (Release date:  2012-03-06)

Northwest Territories

N/A

Yellowknife Region

N/A

Nova Scotia

<Not assigned>

Annapolis Valley Region

Fair – Currently the chances of qualified Biologists and Related Scientists finding employment are considered to be fair in the local area. There is little turnover among those employed by government departments involved in natural resources and environmental regulation. Diversification of Nova Scotia’s economy may provide some job opportunities for biologists with skills appropriate for use in the environmental, pharmaceutical and health sciences industries. For persons with only a bachelor’s degree, employment opportunities may be limited though there may be some employment opportunities as research assistants. There are also some areas of growth such as biotechnology, however these are very specialized jobs and a Ph.D. is often required. A minimum of a master’s degree in biology or a related field is generally required for these positions. To apply for a master’s degree program, you will usually require successful completion of a four-year honours bachelor’s degree program or an acceptable equivalent. A Ph.D. is generally required for biological scientists to teach at colleges or universities or to conduct independent research. Admission to a Ph.D. program usually requires an honours bachelor’s degree with a minimum A- standing and completion of a two-year master’s degree with high academic standing. Applicants must have demonstrated an ability to perform advanced research. In addition to employment opportunities locally, opportunities may exist in other areas of the province or in other regions of the country. People who are able to work elsewhere may want to research opportunities for this occupation in other labour markets within Nova Scotia and across the country. The future employment outlook for Biologists and Related Scientists in Nova Scotia is expected to be fair over the next 5 years. Additional information on Biologists and Related Scientists (opportunities in other areas, training, who hires, current job openings, statistics and other information), is available on other parts of this web site. (Release date:  2011-06-21)

Cape Breton Region

Fair – Currently the chances of qualified Biologists and Related Scientists finding employment are considered to be fair in the local area. The Sydney Tar Ponds project, along with several other projects requiring environmental assessment, monitoring or remediation have created some opportunities for biologists, particularly those with aquatic or marine background. Government departments involved in natural resources and environmental regulation also provide employment to this occupational group. In addition to employment opportunities locally, opportunities may exist in other areas of the province or in other regions of the country. People who are able to work elsewhere may want to research opportunities for this occupation in other labour markets within Nova Scotia and across the country. The future employment outlook for Biologists and Related Scientists in Nova Scotia is expected to be fair over the next 5 years. Additional information on Biologists and Related Scientists (opportunities in other areas, training, who hires, current job openings, statistics and other information), is available on other parts of this web site. (Release date:  2011-05-11)

Halifax Region

Fair – Currently the chances of qualified Biologists and Related Scientists finding employment are considered to be fair in the local area. While there is moderate growth in areas related to biotechnology, these are very specialized jobs and in many cases require doctoral level education. For those with an undergraduate degree only, opportunities may be LIMITED. Two new bioscience centres will open for business in the spring of 2011 at Dalhousie University. The infrastructure provided by the BioScience Enterprise Centre and Life Sciences Research Institute should provide greater future opportunities for this occupation and other related occupations. Local companies such as Ocean Nutrition, Origin Biomed Inc., Precision BioLogic Inc., and MedMira all announced expansion plans or received money to develop their product lines in the past couple of years. Persons in this occupational group are employed in laboratory and field settings by governments, environmental consulting companies, resource and utilities companies, chemical, pharmaceutical and biotechnical companies, and health and educational institutions. In addition to employment opportunities locally, opportunities may exist in other areas of the province or in other regions of the country. People who are able to work elsewhere may want to research opportunities for this occupation in other labour markets within Nova Scotia and across the country. The future employment outlook for Biologists and Related Scientists in Nova Scotia is expected to be fair over the next 5 years. Additional information on Biologists and Related Scientists (opportunities in other areas, training, who hires, current job openings, statistics and other information), is available on other parts of this web site. (Release date:  2011-05-31)

North Shore Region

Fair – Currently the chances of qualified Biologists and Related Scientists finding employment are considered to be fair in the local area. Although the number of people employed locally is small, the supply of qualified candidates may also be low, especially for positions requiring a doctoral degree and/or research experience. Biologists and related scientists may specialize, so, depending on the employer’s need it could be challenging to fill positions. The demand should improve due to an increase in recent marketing and research initiatives related to supporting the agriculture industry. While there have been few public postings for this occupation over the years, the number of unemployed in this category has also been very low. In this area most employment opportunities will be found with environmental consulting companies and departments of the provincial government, such as, Environment, Fisheries and Natural Resources, the Nova Scotia Agricultural College in Truro, and St. Francis Xavier University in Antigonish. In addition to employment opportunities locally, opportunities may exist in other areas of the province or in other regions of the country. People who are able to work elsewhere may want to research opportunities for this occupation in other labour markets within Nova Scotia and across the country. The future employment outlook for Biologists and Related Scientists in Nova Scotia is expected to be fair over the next 5 years. Additional information on Biologists and Related Scientists (opportunities in other areas, training, who hires, current job openings, statistics and other information), is available on other parts of this web site. (Release date:  2011-06-07)

Southern Region

Fair – Currently the chances of qualified Biologists and Related Scientists finding employment are considered to be fair in the local area. Employment potential is fair locally because occasional opportunities exist in both the fish processing sector and government regulatory bodies, generally for contract or term work. Diversification within Nova Scotia’s economy may lead to more opportunities for biologists with skills appropriate for use in the health and environmental sectors. However, a minimum of a masters degree in biology or a related field is generally required for these positions. For persons with only a bachelor’s degree, employment opportunities may be limited though there may be some employment opportunities as research assistants. In addition to employment opportunities locally, opportunities may exist in other areas of the province or in other regions of the country. People who are able to work elsewhere may want to research opportunities for this occupation in other labour markets within Nova Scotia and across the country. The future employment outlook for Biologists and Related Scientists in Nova Scotia is expected to be fair over the next 5 years. Additional information on Biologists and Related Scientists (opportunities in other areas, training, who hires, current job openings, statistics and other information), is available on other parts of this web site. (Release date:  2011-09-08)

Nunavut

N/A

Iqaluit Region

N/A

Ontario

Fair – In Ontario, the outlook for biologists and related scientists is expected to be fair over the period 2012-2013. At the time of the 2006 census, there were about 5,300 biologists and related scientists in Ontario, a 19% increase from the previous census. Compared to other occupations, this is a relatively small occupational group in the province. The majority of biologists and related scientists are concentrated in the Toronto and Ottawa regions. Many biologists are employed in the public sector. Employment for this occupational group may be limited by government funding for the healthcare, energy and environmental sectors. Biologists and related scientists with a high level of education as well as those with a specialization will have the best employment prospects. There is a trend toward employers looking for workers with diverse skill sets that include engineering and project management.

( Release date:  2012-11-30 )

Hamilton–Niagara Peninsula Region

<Not assigned> – Compared to other occupations, this is not a significant occupation in this region In Ontario, the outlook for biologists and related scientists is expected to be fair over the period 2012-2013. At the time of the 2006 census, there were about 5,300 biologists and related scientists in Ontario, a 19% increase from the previous census. Compared to other occupations, this is a relatively small occupational group in the province. The majority of biologists and related scientists are concentrated in the Toronto and Ottawa regions. Many biologists are employed in the public sector. Employment for this occupational group may be limited by government funding for the healthcare, energy and environmental sectors. Biologists and related scientists with a high level of education as well as those with a specialization will have the best employment prospects. There is a trend toward employers looking for workers with diverse skill sets that include engineering and project management. (Release date:  2012-11-30)

Kingston – Pembroke Region

<Not assigned> – Compared to other occupations, this is not a significant occupation in this region In Ontario, the outlook for biologists and related scientists is expected to be fair over the period 2012-2013. At the time of the 2006 census, there were about 5,300 biologists and related scientists in Ontario, a 19% increase from the previous census. Compared to other occupations, this is a relatively small occupational group in the province. The majority of biologists and related scientists are concentrated in the Toronto and Ottawa regions. Many biologists are employed in the public sector. Employment for this occupational group may be limited by government funding for the healthcare, energy and environmental sectors. Biologists and related scientists with a high level of education as well as those with a specialization will have the best employment prospects. There is a trend toward employers looking for workers with diverse skill sets that include engineering and project management. (Release date:  2012-11-30)

Kitchener–Waterloo–Barrie Region

<Not assigned> – Compared to other occupations, this is not a significant occupation in this region In Ontario, the outlook for biologists and related scientists is expected to be fair over the period 2012-2013. At the time of the 2006 census, there were about 5,300 biologists and related scientists in Ontario, a 19% increase from the previous census. Compared to other occupations, this is a relatively small occupational group in the province. The majority of biologists and related scientists are concentrated in the Toronto and Ottawa regions. Many biologists are employed in the public sector. Employment for this occupational group may be limited by government funding for the healthcare, energy and environmental sectors. Biologists and related scientists with a high level of education as well as those with a specialization will have the best employment prospects. There is a trend toward employers looking for workers with diverse skill sets that include engineering and project management. (Release date:  2012-11-30)

London Region

– Compared to other occupations, this is not a significant occupation in this region In Ontario, the outlook for biologists and related scientists is expected to be fair over the period 2012-2013. At the time of the 2006 census, there were about 5,300 biologists and related scientists in Ontario, a 19% increase from the previous census. Compared to other occupations, this is a relatively small occupational group in the province. The majority of biologists and related scientists are concentrated in the Toronto and Ottawa regions. Many biologists are employed in the public sector. Employment for this occupational group may be limited by government funding for the healthcare, energy and environmental sectors. Biologists and related scientists with a high level of education as well as those with a specialization will have the best employment prospects. There is a trend toward employers looking for workers with diverse skill sets that include engineering and project management. (Release date:  2012-11-30)

Muskoka-Kawarthas Region

<Not assigned> – Compared to other occupations, this is not a significant occupation in this region In Ontario, the outlook for biologists and related scientists is expected to be fair over the period 2012-2013. At the time of the 2006 census, there were about 5,300 biologists and related scientists in Ontario, a 19% increase from the previous census. Compared to other occupations, this is a relatively small occupational group in the province. The majority of biologists and related scientists are concentrated in the Toronto and Ottawa regions. Many biologists are employed in the public sector. Employment for this occupational group may be limited by government funding for the healthcare, energy and environmental sectors. Biologists and related scientists with a high level of education as well as those with a specialization will have the best employment prospects. There is a trend toward employers looking for workers with diverse skill sets that include engineering and project management. (Release date:  2012-11-30)

Northeast Region

<Not assigned> – Compared to other occupations, this is not a significant occupation in this region In Ontario, the outlook for biologists and related scientists is expected to be fair over the period 2012-2013. At the time of the 2006 census, there were about 5,300 biologists and related scientists in Ontario, a 19% increase from the previous census. Compared to other occupations, this is a relatively small occupational group in the province. The majority of biologists and related scientists are concentrated in the Toronto and Ottawa regions. Many biologists are employed in the public sector. Employment for this occupational group may be limited by government funding for the healthcare, energy and environmental sectors. Biologists and related scientists with a high level of education as well as those with a specialization will have the best employment prospects. There is a trend toward employers looking for workers with diverse skill sets that include engineering and project management. (Release date:  2012-11-30)

Northwest Region

<Not assigned> – Compared to other occupations, this is not a significant occupation in this region In Ontario, the outlook for biologists and related scientists is expected to be fair over the period 2012-2013. At the time of the 2006 census, there were about 5,300 biologists and related scientists in Ontario, a 19% increase from the previous census. Compared to other occupations, this is a relatively small occupational group in the province. The majority of biologists and related scientists are concentrated in the Toronto and Ottawa regions. Many biologists are employed in the public sector. Employment for this occupational group may be limited by government funding for the healthcare, energy and environmental sectors. Biologists and related scientists with a high level of education as well as those with a specialization will have the best employment prospects. There is a trend toward employers looking for workers with diverse skill sets that include engineering and project management. (Release date:  2012-11-30)

Ottawa Region

<Not assigned> – Compared to other occupations, this is not a significant occupation in this region In Ontario, the outlook for biologists and related scientists is expected to be fair over the period 2012-2013. At the time of the 2006 census, there were about 5,300 biologists and related scientists in Ontario, a 19% increase from the previous census. Compared to other occupations, this is a relatively small occupational group in the province. The majority of biologists and related scientists are concentrated in the Toronto and Ottawa regions. Many biologists are employed in the public sector. Employment for this occupational group may be limited by government funding for the healthcare, energy and environmental sectors. Biologists and related scientists with a high level of education as well as those with a specialization will have the best employment prospects. There is a trend toward employers looking for workers with diverse skill sets that include engineering and project management. (Release date:  2012-11-30)

Stratford–Bruce Peninsula Region

<Not assigned> – Compared to other occupations, this is not a significant occupation in this region In Ontario, the outlook for biologists and related scientists is expected to be fair over the period 2012-2013. At the time of the 2006 census, there were about 5,300 biologists and related scientists in Ontario, a 19% increase from the previous census. Compared to other occupations, this is a relatively small occupational group in the province. The majority of biologists and related scientists are concentrated in the Toronto and Ottawa regions. Many biologists are employed in the public sector. Employment for this occupational group may be limited by government funding for the healthcare, energy and environmental sectors. Biologists and related scientists with a high level of education as well as those with a specialization will have the best employment prospects. There is a trend toward employers looking for workers with diverse skill sets that include engineering and project management. (Release date:  2012-11-30)

Toronto Region

Fair – Employment prospects for biologists and related scientists are expected to be fair for 2012-2013 in the Toronto economic region. According to the 2006 census, there were about 2,000 biologists and related scientists in the Toronto economic region, an increase of nearly 18% from the previous census. The number of job opportunities will be limited by the fact that this is a relatively small occupational group in the Toronto economic region compared to other occupations. However, there is a high concentration of research facilities, universities and hospitals in the Toronto area that promote research and development. Close to two-fifths of Ontario workers were found in the Toronto economic region, according to the 2006 census. Compared to all occupations in the region, biologists and related scientists are a younger workforce. Less than one-fifth of workers are over the age of 50, therefore, retirements will contribute limited openings over the next several years. In Ontario, the outlook for biologists and related scientists is expected to be fair over the period 2012-2013. At the time of the 2006 census, there were about 5,300 biologists and related scientists in Ontario, a 19% increase from the previous census. Compared to other occupations, this is a relatively small occupational group in the province. The majority of biologists and related scientists are concentrated in the Toronto and Ottawa regions. Many biologists are employed in the public sector. Employment for this occupational group may be limited by government funding for the healthcare, energy and environmental sectors. Biologists and related scientists with a high level of education as well as those with a specialization will have the best employment prospects. There is a trend toward employers looking for workers with diverse skill sets that include engineering and project management. (Release date:  2012-11-30)

Windsor-Sarnia Region

<Not assigned> – Compared to other occupations, this is not a significant occupation in this region In Ontario, the outlook for biologists and related scientists is expected to be fair over the period 2012-2013. At the time of the 2006 census, there were about 5,300 biologists and related scientists in Ontario, a 19% increase from the previous census. Compared to other occupations, this is a relatively small occupational group in the province. The majority of biologists and related scientists are concentrated in the Toronto and Ottawa regions. Many biologists are employed in the public sector. Employment for this occupational group may be limited by government funding for the healthcare, energy and environmental sectors. Biologists and related scientists with a high level of education as well as those with a specialization will have the best employment prospects. There is a trend toward employers looking for workers with diverse skill sets that include engineering and project management. (Release date:  2012-11-30)

Prince Edward Island

Good – Employment prospects for biologists and related scientists are expected to be good in 2012-2013. Continued growth and expansion in the bioscience industry due to increased research, development and commercialization of bioactives is creating demand in this occupation. The provincial government is actively promoting this industry and trying to lure new businesses to the province. Turnover is generally low and some employers have difficulties recruiting due to the very specialized training that is required for some positions. Biologists with post-graduate degrees relevant to local research initiatives have better prospects of finding employment. Opportunities outside of the bioscience industry are more limited. There are few advertised job openings and there is a lot of competition for jobs in wildlife, fisheries and environmental biology.

( Release date:  2012-02-28 )

Québec

N/A

Abitibi-Témiscamingue Region

Fair – For the 2012-2014 period, job opportunities in the Abitibi-Temiscamingue region are expected to be fair for this occupation. (Release date:  2012-10-09)

Bas-Saint-Laurent Region

Limited – For the 2012-2014 period, job opportunities in the Bas-Saint-Laurent region are expected to be limited for this occupation. Employment in this occupation has increased slightly over the past few years in Bas-Saint-Laurent. Marine and environmental sciences are part of the region’s ACCORD niches of excellence, which means that numerous research projects have been carried out. The main sectors that employ biologists and other scientists are public administration (46%), professional, scientific and technical services (23%) and the primary sector (18%). Employment numbers will be stable in the coming years. Given that the government is not only a major employer, but also provides significant funding for research projects, government spending levels play a key role in the demand for biologists. Government cuts, therefore, will have a negative impact on employment for biologists over the 2012-2014 forecast period. The employment outlook will be better for biologists who have a master’s degree or PhD. A few openings will stem from the replacement of retiring workers. In the region, 11% of biologists are aged 55 or over. These jobs will be open to new graduates and experienced biologists who are unemployed. A few biologists in the region are receiving Employment Insurance benefits. (Release date:  2013-01-10)

Capitale-Nationale Region

Fair – For the 2012-2014 period, job opportunities in the Capitale-Nationale region are expected to be fair for this occupation. A Master’s degree or a doctorate in chemistry, chemical engineering, biochemistry or a related field is usually required. Membership in the Ordre des chimistes is mandatory. Depending on the position and sector, an in-depth knowledge of biochemistry, microbiology, chemical engineering, medical biochemistry, biomaterials, industrial chemical production, plant and animal biology, food sciences or genomics may be required. The employment outlook will be better in research centres, clinical research companies and private firms. An excellent knowledge of French and English is usually required. (Release date:  2012-10-04)

Centre-du-Québec Region

<Not assigned> – Compared to other occupations, this is a relatively small occupational group in the Centre-du-Québec region with few and infrequent job opportunities. (Release date:  2013-09-03)

Chaudière-Appalaches Region

Fair – For the 2012-2014 period, job opportunities in the Chaudière-Appalaches region are expected to be fair for this occupation. Openings will come primarily from a high increase in employment, but also from replacement needs due to retirements. According to the 2006 census data, most workers in this occupational group are employed in the public administration (40%) and in health care and social assistance industry (20%). A Master’s degree or a doctorate in chemistry, chemical engineering, biochemistry or a related field is usually required. Membership in the Ordre des chimistes is mandatory. Depending on the position and sector, an in-depth knowledge of biochemistry, microbiology, chemical engineering, medical biochemistry, biomaterials, industrial chemical production, plant and animal biology, food sciences or genomics may be required. The employment outlook will be better in research centres, clinical research companies and private firms. An excellent knowledge of French and English is usually required. (Release date:  2012-10-24)

Côte-Nord Region

Fair – For the 2012-2014 period, job opportunities in the Côte-Nord region are expected to be fair for this occupation. (Release date:  2012-12-03)

Estrie Region

Good – For the 2012-2014 period, job opportunities in the Estrie region are expected to be good for this occupation. (Release date:  2012-11-15)

Gaspésie — Îles-de-la-Madeleine Region

Fair – For the 2012-2014 period, job opportunities in the Gaspésie – Îles-de-la-Madeleine region are expected to be fair for this occupation. (Release date:  2012-10-10)

Lanaudière Region

<Not assigned> – Compared to other occupations, this is a relatively small occupational group in the local area with few and infrequent job opportunities. (Release date:  2012-11-13)

Laurentides Region

Fair – For the 2012-2014 period, job opportunities in the Laurentides region are expected to be fair for this occupation. (Release date:  2012-10-30)

Laval Region

Fair – For the 2012-2014 period, job opportunities in the Laval region are expected to be fair for this occupation. Over half of the job openings will result from the creation of many new positions, while just under half will result from retirements. The pool of work ready claimants in this occupational group is small. This occupation requires a university degree. Studies at the Master’s or doctoral level are an increasingly important asset. The findings of the Relance survey by the Department of Education show a low placement rate and a high unemployment rate for those with only a Bachelor’s degree. Most go on to do a Master’s degree or doctorate. In recent years, the number of biologists and related scientists has risen sharply. Given the growth in research and development in areas related to biology (biodiversity, human genome, genetically modified organisms (GMOs), biotechnology, pharmacology and so on), the number of biologists and related scientists should continue to increase over the 2012-2014 forecast horizon. According to 2006 census data, workers in this occupational group were employed mainly in professional, scientific and technical services; health care and social assistance; public administration; chemical manufacturing; and educational services. (Release date:  2013-04-25)

Mauricie Region

Fair – For the 2012-2014 period, job opportunities in the Mauricie region are expected to be fair for this occupation. (Release date:  2012-11-14)

Montérégie Region

Fair – For the 2012 – 2014 period, job opportunities in the Monteregie region are expected to be fair for this occupation. (Release date:  2012-10-25)

Montréal Region

Fair – For 2012 -2014, the employment outlook in the Montréal region is expected to be Good for this occupation. Over half of the job openings will result from the creation of many new positions, while just under half will result from retirements. The pool of work ready claimants in this occupational group is small. This occupation requires a university degree. Studies at the Master’s or doctoral level are an increasingly important asset. The findings of the Relance survey by the Department of Education show a low placement rate and a high unemployment rate for those with only a Bachelor’s degree. Most go on to do a Master’s degree or doctorate. In recent years, the number of biologists and related scientists has risen sharply. Given the growth in research and development in areas related to biology (biodiversity, human genome, genetically modified organisms (GMOs), biotechnology, pharmacology and so on), the number of biologists and related scientists should continue to increase over the 2012 -2014 forecast horizon. According to 2006 census data, workers in this occupational group were employed mainly in professional, scientific and technical services; health care and social assistance; public administration; chemical manufacturing; and educational services. (Release date:  2012-11-19)

Nord-du-Québec Region

N/A

Outaouais Region

Fair – For the 2012-2014 period, job opportunities in the Outaouais region are expected to be fair for this occupation. The employment level in these occupations has remained relatively stable over the last few years. Demand for labour will be chiefly to fill positions left vacant by retiring biologists, even though the proportion of people age 55 and over is lower than in the aggregate of all occupations (10% as opposed to 12%, according to the 2006 census) and to a lesser extent due to employment growth. The Ottawa-Gatineau area is home to several federal government departments that employ biologists and other scientists in this occupational group; they are facing the challenges posed by an aging workforce, and the number of retirements in the Public Service is expected to increase in the coming years. Openings will be accessible to recent graduates, seasoned biologists and immigrants with recognized training. According to 2006 census data, biologists and other scientists in the Outaouais region are employed mainly in public administration (63%), professional, scientific and technical services (20%) and health care and social assistance (7%). Employers are looking for highly qualified people with a knack for analysis, synthesis and problem solving, who work well in a team, communicate well and can concentrate. (Release date:  2012-10-10)

Saguenay–Lac-Saint-Jean Region

Good – For the 2012-2014 period, job opportunities in the Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean region are expected to be good for this occupation. (Release date:  2012-10-24)

Saskatchewan

N/A

Northern Region

N/A

Prince Albert Region

N/A

Regina–Moose Mountain Region

N/A

Saskatoon–Biggar Region

N/A

Swift Current–Moose Jaw Region

N/A

Yorkton–Melville Region

N/A

Yukon

Fair – Currently the chances of qualified Biologists and Related Scientists finding employment are considered to be fair in the local area. While there is moderate growth in areas related to biotechnology, these are very specialized jobs and in many cases require doctoral level education. For those with an undergraduate degree only, opportunities may be limited.

( Release date:  2010-01-11 )

 

Date Modified:

2013-09-05

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